Anyone who has ever painted or drawn knows the experience of dropping out of the world of words and time. A state of reverie takes over; there is no sensation of the passing of hours. The voice inside our head that allows us to talk to ourselves falls silent, and there is only color, form, texture and the way things flow together.

There is a theory to explain this. Language is centered on the left side of the brain. Art lives on the right side. You can’t draw a thing as long as you’re thinking about it in words. That’s why artists are inarticulate about their work, and why it is naive to ask them, “What were you thinking about when you did this?” They have given it less thought than you have.

Roger Ebert

Everything is impermanent. But so is impermanence.

Laurence Freeman
Lent Reflection, Feb. 27, 2015 (World Center for Christian Meditation, 2015)

Most people are scared of dying, and that fear will motivate terrible, panicked behavior when a disaster breaks out. I’m not afraid to die. I don’t look forward to it but I’m not afraid of it.

I try to live in such a way as to overcome the fear of death more and more. I’m convinced this is the very best way to live and, when my time comes for dying, I’ll be glad I learned to live that way.

I don’t want to live, or die, in fear.

David Flowers

“Don’t Miss the Horizon”
by David Flowers/Wildwind Community Church

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Sermon Podcast
July 27, 2014

In this message I talk about the recent loss of one of my closest friends and try to bring out some of our faith’s most important lessons. It is these insights we must cling to in these times.